GINGIVITIS MAY BE THE CAUSE OF YOUR CATS BAD BREATH

Posted on August 31, 2017 By

Gingivitis and bad breath are the last things on our mind when we pick up that small ball of fur and fall in love with the cutest and most loveable kitten in the world. We fall in love with their color, personalities and other unique qualities they have.

Kittens need to be about six to eight weeks old before they are ready to leave their mother. Kittens have 26 deciduous teeth and about six to seven months they will be replaced by 30 permanent teeth.

Cats are carnivores!!! The only time they eat plants is when it is in cat food we feed them. Cats left on their own, dine on a meat diet. Their teeth, not even the molars, have grinding surfaces.

I think, cats have the sharpest teeth in the world. When my cat takes a nip at me at bath time it is like I have been mass attacked by needles. I feel sure that if she wanted to she could rip a plug right out of my hand or forearm.

Gingivitis is the precursor to periodontal disease in cats, dogs and even humans. By the age of three years about 70% of cats, without proper dental hygiene, show signs of having gingivitis or periodontitis.

The first sign that your cat may have a problem is bad breath. Bad breath is not a joking matter in your feline friend. It is a system of a root condition and one condition may be gingivitis.

Gingivitis is easy to prevent and easy to treat if caught early. The best prevention is to brush your kitten/cats teeth on a daily basis. Yes, you read this correctly. Brushing your cat’s teeth will save it many hours of pain in the future and you a lot of money.

When you take your feline friend to the veterinarian for a check-up; talk about dental care. They can even show you how to brush your cat’s teeth and recommend what tooth paste to use.

Do not use your tooth paste for your cat. It has a foaming agent in it and it will make your cat sick. Cats cannot spit and toothpaste made for us will not only make it sick but may also choke your feline friend. Many types of human toothpaste contain Xylitol, a sweetener that is highly toxic to dogs. The verdict is still out on what Xylitol may do to cats. I do not want to take a chance.

Use toothpaste that is made and flavored for cats. If your cat likes the taste and brushing the teeth is a pleasurable experience you will less likely get bit or scratched.

One secret to a healthy pet is healthy teeth and gums.

Yvonne

Dogs and Cats