Kids Vs. Cooperation Four Ways To Get Them To Listen To You!

Posted on February 14, 2017 By

How many times have you said, “Don’t do that” only to have your youngster continue rocking back on the dining room chair? There are four errors with that statement. Let’s consider each tip individually.

1.Be Positive – If you want your young children to cooperate, you need to inform them precisely what you wish them to do, rather than what you don’t want them to do. Don’t and can’t are invisible commands. Kids only hear what comes after. Therefore, they translate “Don’t rock back on the chair” into “Rock back on the chair.”

2.Be Precise – When you said, “Don’t do that,” your youngster doesn’t know what you mean by “that.” It could mean rocking on the chair, chewing his gum, or teasing his sister. When you want to prevent inappropriate behavior, you must let the kids know precisely what form of conduct you expect. Here’s a positive alternative with precise information: “Put your chair down so all four legs stay on the ground.” Now junior is aware of what you want.

3.Add a reason – Certainly, he understands what you want, but he doesn’t know why it’s in his best interest to obey. To a kid, a parental request sounds like a dictatorship. Unless you offer an explanation, your youngster will continue to disobey. Add this sentence to your request: “So you don’t crack your head open after you fall.”

4.Add humor – Up to now, you’ve instructed your youngster what to do in a specific manner while providing a reason to obey. When you add humor, your child laughs, and the happy endorphins generate a message in his brain that says your request is acceptable to him. Add the last part of the sentence: “So you don’t crack your head open after you fall like Humpty Dumpty.”

So there you’ve got it, an effective way to get your little ones to cooperate. It’s no secret that when kids understand what you want and why you want it, told in a pleasant manner, they don’t have any option but to comply! (Well, almost always!)

Parents and Kids